Reading Matters

Doug Wilhelm is a full-time writer and an independent publisher in Weybridge, Vemont. His 13 novels for young adults include The Revealers (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2003), which has been the focus of reading-and-discussion projects in well over 1,000 middle schools; its sequel, True Shoes (Long Stride Books, 2012), and Doug's newest book, The Prince of Denial (Long Stride, 2013).

Working past the fear

The fear is always there, before you start. If you can just start, then you’re in it and you’re okay.

I mean this to apply to writing, because that’s my experience — but how many other things can it also describe? Bungee jumping? I have no idea about that. But what about anything that’s worthwhile, that calls on what’s inside of us? For each of us that's different, it's personal what we’re pushed by ourselves to do, what we long to do — but I wonder if there isn’t this fear almost always.

It gathers before you start, and the answer is ... to start.

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The wings of compassion

I was trying to learn in Chicago in around 1920 and was searching for the unnoticed things that made emotions, such as the way an outfielder tossed his glove without looking back to where it fell ... These were the things which moved you before you knew the story.
Ernest Hemingway, interviewed by George Plimpton for Writers at Work, Second Series, 1963

Two subjects I’ve read about off and on for years, always returning to them and finding inspiration, are Hemingway’s approach to writing and the Buddhist practice of mindfulness, or simple attention to what’s happening now. I’ve just lately seen a connection between those two — one that to me at least is illuminating, and that I’ve never thought of before.

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Making friends with my notebook again

I like an old-fashioned copybook, with the black-and-white marble covers, and I don’t like lines. You have to send away for those. Mine come from Roaring Spring Paper Products, of Roaring Spring, Pa., and I like how that sounds. But for a long time my notebooks sat in my closet, unwritten-in, untouched for months. Even as I urged middle schoolers who were interested in writing to “make friends with a notebook,” I had let my own relationship, a key one in my life, lapse and fade.

So last week I brought the last-used notebook back out.

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Where did the flow go?

During the school year I talk all the time to middle schoolers about keeping a writer’s notebook — about observing and noting and encouraging your creative flow. And this year I felt like a fake.

I’ve been at this work so long, earning my living as a fulltime freelancer for 30 years now, and you have to produce so much stuff to pay the bills and stay afloat ... it seems as if the flow of ideas and observancy, for me, has been dredged out or pounded away. I don’t write in my notebooks any more. I’m not sprouting ideas for new stories or projects; I’m turning the crank.

Does that sound familiar?

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What should we tell an avid young writer?

Writers are continuing to write no matter whether publishing is dying, or closing itself off to all but the bestsellers, says an online op-ed piece posted yesterday at The New York Times. The essay, by a Times editor, describes “staylit” — writing by writers about continuing to write. Apparently this is now a thing.

I continue to write too, so maybe at this moment I’m producing staylit — except that the Times piece got me thinking less about my own stuff, and more about a group of eighth graders that I sat with in their school library about ten days ago, at Hanscomb Air Force Base in Bedford, MA.

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Launching a kids' book with Kickstarter: What worked for us

An illustrator and I put up a Kickstarter campaign to fund publication of our new children’s book — and we've succeeded. So what have we learned?

I think this is a question worth answering. Kickstarter has become, so it says, the largest funder of creative projects in the world. Assuming this is true, it’s pretty revolutionary — because this is not a corporate funder, not Sony or Disney or Scholastic; it’s a crowd-sourcing funder. Almost anyone can now easily become a front-end contributor to the creative economy. You can pledge as little as $10 to support a project. And just about anyone with a creative project, like a new kids’ book, now has the chance to get it funded and launched.

But about three-quarters of Kickstarters fail. To give a campaign its best shot, Kickstarter itself gives you some good advice. Do a good, short, genuine video. Offer affordable rewards. Solicit good critical feedback, and tweak carefully before you launch. (You can find this advice and more by going to the very bottom of the www.kickstarter.com home page and selecting Kickstarter School.)

So what can we add?

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The last of Anna Madrigal

Beginning to read Armistead Maupin’s new Tales of the City book feels a little like walking into a college reunion that you know will be your last. Except, to be honest, I feel as if I know these characters better than I ever got to know anyone at my old school.

If you’re another one of the millions who’ve loved these books — and if you've read on the dust jacket that The Days of Anna Madrigal, in which the series’ unifying figure, around whom the others have revolved, is 92 now and preparing for the end of her days, will be the final installment — then you know what I mean. If you haven’t yet discovered these stories, you’re lucky! You have the chance to read them for the first time.

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The Wonder of a moral story

Vermont where I live has an annual children’s book award chosen by young readers, and this year’s winner is R.J. Palacio’s Wonder, about a fifth grader with severe facial deformity. The novel is also the focus of this year’s Vermont Reads, a statewide community reading program. I read Wonder on an airplane early this month — and what I most admired, among much to like in a touching and thought-provoking story, is this:

By taking us into the experience of a child whose appearance can seem horrifying, this writer finds a way to do what almost nobody gets away with doing, in YA fiction today: be vulnerably honest about kindness, about decency, about doing the right thing.

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Brother, sister, Kickstarter

Writers and illustrators have always had to go hat in hand (if we could afford a hat) to major publishers to ask if they would bring out our stuff. This system didn’t work too badly when there were many major book publishers — but today there are five, and they’re all so corporate that trying to approach them can be like talking to the TV. You are not going to get a response. 



But there are new, emerging ways for creative work to find an audience. One of the biggest barriers, of course, is money; and one of the most powerful and fascinating new developments is Kickstarter.

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The treasure box

The Campaign for Grade-Level Reading, a nationwide partnership of foundations, nonprofits, states, and communities, starts with a striking premise: “Reading proficiency by third grade is the most important predictor of high school graduation and career success.” But there’s a huge gap in that proficiency, between children of low-income families and the rest of our kids.

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Like a rolling flow

Bob Dylan’s handwritten drafts of the lyrics for “Like a Rolling Stone” and “A Hard Rain’s Gonna Fall” are being put up for auction by Sotheby’s. They may go for $2 million, or more. But the best part (unless you have $2 million to spare) is that we can look at these drafts right here, on the New York Times's ArtsBeat blog. “Rolling Stone” is scribbled on stationary from the Roger Smith Hotel (“One block from the White House”) in Washington, D.C. — and these pages offer a fascinating window into, or a sketch of, the creative process.

The first thing I notice is: they’re written in pencil. That’s worth thinking about.

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The bigots are aging. Kids give me hope.

After a week of news dominated by two old boneheaded racists, I would like to tell you about a day I spent with a very different group of people. They’re eighth graders at Greenfield (Indiana) Central Junior High School, and they decided that too many people were getting hurt by intolerance and bullying at their school. So they've done something about it.

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Ordinary miracles: the life of a story

I would like to explain myself to the Starbuck’s employee in Greenfield, Indiana, who yesterday brought around a tray, with thimble-sized free samples of whatever new frozen frappa-cappa-mocha-whipped-creamachino they were preparing to feature. I’d been looking at my screen with my earbuds in when the guy, bearing his tray, said, “Sir?” I looked up and tears were running down my face.

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New findings: bullying & lasting isolation

Middle-aged adults who were bullied as kids are more likely to be isolated, less likely to be living with a partner, less optimistic about their lives, and more likely to be unemployed. These findings come from a very long-term study, reported in the LA Times and other outlets this weekend, which I’m reading about in the Albany airport as I’m about to board a flight to talk with middle schoolers in Indiana who’ve read The Revealers, my young-adult novel on bullying.

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My notebooks, and how I don't fill them

Middle schoolers write more stuff in my notebooks than I do.

Honestly. I carry about these little blank books that are perfect for me — first, because they don’t have spiral bindings. I learned many years ago that spiral bindings in pocket notebooks tend, over time and use, to unspiral just enough to poke holes in your clothes. And anyway I don’t like them. So I get these pocket Moleskines, good-quality old-fashioned notebooks.
But left on my own with these things, I might never fill them up.

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The discipline of simplicity

It’s much harder to write short than long. So why do we assume that fatter books must be better, or that slender novels can’t be great?

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Kris Ricigliano
My writing tends to be spare, which I've attributed to two things: my training as a journalist, and my reluctance to take up space... Read More
Thursday, 24 April 2014 13:16
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A slow-reading movement? Count me in

Everyone needs a cause, right? I’m often linked to bullying prevention because of my book The Revealers, and that’s fine; but I’ve found a new cause. Slow reading.

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A mouse, a science fair, and vague endings

Young readers are often exasperated by the endings of my books, because they tend not to wrap things up neatly enough. One reader called one ending “retarded,” which is a word better applied to books than people, at least. But today I discovered I’m in company with a far far better writer: E.B. White used to get much the same complaint, if in different vocabulary.

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The brave new world of first drafts

I’m not worried about the future of writing. But I am wondering what'll happen to rewriting.

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One good paragraph about spring

Because March is National Reading Month, which I didn’t realize until this week, and since this is the first week of spring on the calendar — if not outside, where here in Vermont the snow persists and mud season has only just begun to soften up — I went looking yesterday for the perfect spring paragraph.

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